London Readers – Get Sharper with Harper

Hi

Just a quick post to promote my good friend, Master Instructor Hugh Harpers new website at http://www.getsharperwithharper.com/

If you live in the London area and either want a great martial arts class with his Choi Kwang Do lessons, some brilliant boxcercise type classes with his Fight Klub class, or want to get insanely fit with his Insanity classes then give Hugh a call.

This guy is one of the TOP instructors in the UK and the World for Choi Kwang Do. He is one of the few people I will go to for my own personal training and improvement. Check his classes out, you wont be dissapointed.

Regards

Dale

Basic rules for defending against knifes and edged weapons

This short video covers a few of the basic principles I teach on how to defend against knifes and edged weapons.  I don’t teach any of the defence moves themselves, but talk about the important things you need to consider and bear in mind if you are ever unfortunate enough to be threatened or attacked with a sharp weapon.

 

I hope you enjoy this article.  If you are interested in Choi Kwang Do classes for your child, family member or yourself and are in the Bristol or Trowbridge area then please go to my web site at http://www.CKDBristol.co.uk for more information on our Choi Kwang Do classes that are great for teaching you self defence, self confidence and also keeping you fit and healthy no matter your age.  We offer 2 FREE lessons to all who sign up via the web site.

If you don’t live in my area and are interested in Choi Kwang Do then please visit http://choikwangdo.com/locations.html where you can find the nearest location to you.  Most of the classes offer some sort of free lessons so please take a look.

If you are already an instructor in another Martial Art and you would be interested in converting to Choi Kwang Do please go to http://choikwangdo.com/school-conversion.html or contact them by email at ckd@choikwangdo.com and let them know you found them through Master Millers blog.

Regards

Dale Miller

Master Instructor of Choi Kwang Do.

Basic rules for defending against blunt weapons such as baseball bats

This short video covers a few of the basic principles I teach on how to defend against blunt weapons such as baseball bats, crowbars, tyre irons and so on.  I don’t teach any of the defence moves themselves, but talk about the important things you need to consider and bear in mind if you are ever unfortunate enough to be attacked with a blunt weapon.

 

I hope you enjoy this article.  If you are interested in Choi Kwang Do classes for your child, family member or yourself and are in the Bristol or Trowbridge area then please go to my web site at http://www.CKDBristol.co.uk for more information on our Choi Kwang Do classes that are great for teaching you self defence, self confidence and also keeping you fit and healthy no matter your age.  We offer 2 FREE lessons to all who sign up via the web site.

If you don’t live in my area and are interested in Choi Kwang Do then please visit http://choikwangdo.com/locations.html where you can find the nearest location to you.  Most of the classes offer some sort of free lessons so please take a look.

If you are already an instructor in another Martial Art and you would be interested in converting to Choi Kwang Do please go to http://choikwangdo.com/school-conversion.html or contact them by email at ckd@choikwangdo.com and let them know you found them through Master Millers blog.

Regards

Dale Miller

Master Instructor of Choi Kwang Do.

Choi Kwang Do- Master 80% of your hand techniques with 4 body movements.

UPDATED WITH VIDEOS DEMONSTRATING THE 80% OF THE REAR AND FRONT HAND TECHNIQUES.

There is an elegance and simplicity in all of of the choi kwang do hand techniques that makes them incredibly simple to learn and master. Choi Kwang Do techniques are based on sequential motion, using a step by step approach to generate the powerfull movements. Also the fact that we utilise the same stance for all of these techniques further simplifies everything as once we learn that stance all of the techniques can flow from it.

If we break the choi kwang do hand techniques into four groups, rear hand punches, front hand punches, strikes and blocks there is a specific sequence of movements performed that is common throughout about 80 to 90 percent of the techniques for each group. How you move your legs, hip and thigh, twist your torso remains exactly the same throughout. The final part of the technique which decides which punch, block or strike you are using only takes up around ten percent or so of the entire movement pattern.

This 80% or so of each sequential movement of the technique you perform is also responsible for delivering around 80% of the power you can generate in your hand techniques.

With the blocks, the 80% or so of the initial technique creates distance for you, gives you more time to react, narrows your profile giving less of a target and limiting the chances of a blow doing maximim damage without even using the blocking arm to block.

When blocking we push up a little onto the ball of the front foot, shift our weight back onto the rear leg, turning in slightly, creating distance and narrowing profile. From there both of the shoulders shrug up with the rear arm staying up to guard and the front arm then performs the block.

With the 3 strikes in choi kwang do, the basic movement patten is again the same. We turn in slightly, bringing the front striking arm down towards the rear elbow. From there we push off of the back leg and twist the torso quickly whipping the bent striking arm up towards the target. Finally the arm extends making contact with the weapon, either the side of the fist, Back of the fist or the knife hand, before following through and returning to the guard position.

If you take the rear hand techniques, again you see that there is a huge similarity in the movement sequence of the techniques, only changing when it comes to releasing the rear arm and performing the punch.

The technique starts from the stance, body weight leaned back a little on the rear leg. From there we start by pushing off of the rear foot driving it into the ground, then the knee, thigh and hip drive forward. The hip starts to twist and rotate the torso, with the rear arm locked into place while the body creates a little plyometric stretch in the shoulder. As you see in my 6 tips to improve your punches article this entire sequence of events is found to generate approximately 75.88% of the total power of your punch. From there we roll the shoulder and perform whatever rear hand technique we wish.

Finally look at the front hand techniques. Again there is a huge commonality in the techniques. Starting from a good stance, body weight slightly to the rear leg, you push off of the rear foot, driving your knee, hip and thigh forward. Your torso twists bringing your rear shoulder in line with the front shoulder. This is what we refer to as counter rotating the hips. From that position your front side hip drives in, twisting your torso, opening up your chest creating a plyometric stretch. From there again we simply roll the shoulder and perform the front hand techniques we require.

So by really learning and mastering these basic sequential movements you have learned 80% of all the hand techniques up to black belt. It really is worth investing the time to get these mechanics right as not only will they deliver most of the power in your strikes and punches but also, as you progress to a new belt you then only have to concentrate on learning how your arm need to be positioned and what part to use as the weapon making it far easier to master.

When you realise this simplicity believe it really proves just how much thought has gone into making choi kwang do hand techniques, simple, powerful, yet devastatingly effective and is a great testimony to Grandmaster Choi’s knowledge and ability as a martial arts pioneer.

3 Tips to improve your Punches: https://youtu.be/5Wq3KOjpeyg

I hope you enjoy this article.  If you are interested in Choi Kwang Do classes for your child, family member or yourself and are in the Bristol or Trowbridge area then please go to my web site at http://www.CKDBristol.co.uk for more information on our Choi Kwang Do classes that are great for teaching you self defence, self confidence and also keeping you fit and healthy no matter your age.  We offer 2 FREE lessons to all who sign up via the web site.

If you don’t live in my area and are interested in Choi Kwang Do then please visit http://choikwangdo.com/locations.html where you can find the nearest location to you.  Most of the classes offer some sort of free lessons so please take a look.

If you are already an instructor in another Martial Art and you would be interested in converting to Choi Kwang Do please go to http://choikwangdo.com/school-conversion.html or contact them by email at ckd@choikwangdo.com and let them know you found them through Master Millers blog.

Regards

Dale Miller

Master Instructor of Choi Kwang Do.

Combat martial arts magazine article from April 2011

The following article was published in the uk martial arts magazine, Combat. The main topic was the paradox that most self defence classes teach you to defend yourself you have to get hit and hurt. That always seems a crazy attitude to me and this  article outlines why we train the way we do in choi kwang do.

I’m adding the article in the firm of jpgs of the pages but if people leave comments saying they would rather it in word format i will consider housing the original text file.

Self Defence articles
Why should self defence HURT?
Page 1 why should self defence HURT?
Page 1 why should self defence HURT?

 

 

Why should self defence HURT
Why should self defence HURT

I hope you enjoy this article.  If you are interested in Choi Kwang Do classes for your child, family member or yourself and are in the Bristol or Trowbridge area then please go to my web site at http://www.CKDBristol.co.uk for more information on our Choi Kwang Do classes that are great for teaching you self defence, self confidence and also keeping you fit and healthy no matter your age.  We offer 2 FREE lessons to all who sign up via the web site.

If you don’t live in my area and are interested in Choi Kwang Do then please visit http://choikwangdo.com/locations.html where you can find the nearest location to you.  Most of the classes offer some sort of free lessons so please take a look.

If you are already an instructor in another Martial Art and you would be interested in converting to Choi Kwang Do please go to http://choikwangdo.com/school-conversion.html or contact them by email at ckd@choikwangdo.com and let them know you found them through Master Millers blog.

Regards

Dale Miller

Master Instructor of Choi Kwang Do.

How NOT to defend yourself – Or surviving a Zombie ATTACK!!!

The picture i’m about to share with you is doing the rounds of Facebook and other social media.  I’m sure whoever thought it up really did have the best interest of people at heart but the advice in it is so bad I just had to do a short post to debunk it.  If you do see this picture, PLEASE don’t forward it on anymore.  It is likely to get someone seriously hurt or worse and I will go into the reasons for that in a moment.

Here is the picture in all its glory….

DONT TRY THIS AT HOME
DONT TRY THIS AT HOME

Just from the first 3 steps alone, its BAD advice.

Step 1.  You see some weird zombie looking guy approach you with arms outstretched.  Lets consider something we could do right now in step one to stop them.  The lady could knock the arms out of the way then hit him back, although my initial reaction would be to have her KICK to zombie hard and fast.  Legs are longer than arms in general so she should use her legs to her advantage.

Step 2. Ducking down.  Ok, if this is a zombie attacking and doing so in stereotypical slow fashion, then she would possibly have the time to duck down like this.  In reality, if its a guy rushing in towards her, ducking down as he comes in with momentum is probably not the best idea.  He can react by dropping his arms down and grabbing you and wrestling you to the ground. He could smash his knee into your head. Or he could just use his momentum to knock you over anyways.  Don’t try this at home kids….

Step 3.  Lets powerfully spring up hitting the zombie in the chin or face with our head.  That is going to hurt… the defender.  It even has the potential for you to help your lovely zombie attacker out by having you knock yourself out. That’s right.  Lets get ourselves in a state of unconsciousness as a means to defend ourselves from something bad happening to us.  Brilliant advice.

Steps 4,5 and 6.  Assuming we haven’t knocked ourselves out and have stunned said zombie its time for our counter attacks.  Yee Ha.  You go girl. Beat him up like your Daryl from the walking dead.  Minus the crossbows of course.

Step 8-9.  Assuming its a zombie, fine.  Kick him while he is down, who cares.  If its a human being then your risking the fact that you have now turned what was potentially an attack on you from a self defence, into an assault on your own attacker.  Yup that’s right.  If you have someone attack you, and you knock them down you have defended yourself.  Congratulations. Now get away from them as fast as you can and get safe. Stamping on them, kicking them while they are prone on the floor and you have turned it into an assault on them.  Great some of you might think.  He deserved it.  But do you really want to risk going to jail if the only witness to what happened just so happened to catch the end of the confrontation and all they see is this horrible violent woman kicking an injured man while down on the ground.  Hows that for adding insult to injury.  Hell you may even have to pay him compensation for your violent attack on him.  I’m sure there are plenty of lawyers out there who will take this case on a no win no fee basis.

And finally, lets think about the situation.  Even if this “DEFENCE” worked.  You’re being attacked, the blood is rushing to your limbs as your fight or flight system kicks in.  The adrenaline is flooding your system and your brain, through lack of blood is slowing down and finding it much harder to think clearly. Now you have to try and remember steps 1 to 9 while under pressure and its something you only saw on Facebook, not something you actually practiced with any repetition so that it becomes an unconscious reaction to the attack.  The trick is to keep self defence movements as SIMPLE AS POSSIBLE so you can remember them when your brain isn’t working as all the blood as gone to your limbs.

Yes,i’m being very tongue in cheek with this blog post, but the principle is there.  This kind of stuff is dangerous to pass on.  Its amateurish, and more likely to result in the woman getting seriously hurt than it is in her defending herself.  IF you are that worried about someone and want them to be safe then send them to a well run self defence class, like mine :).  They can learn safe, effective self defence skills that wont result in them knocking themselves out and leaving themselves to the mercy of some weird zombie man….

I hope you enjoy this article.  If your interested in Choi Kwang Do classes for your child, family member or yourself and are in the Bristol or Trowbridge area then please go to my web site at http://www.CKDBristol.co.uk for more information on our Choi Kwang Do classes that are great for teaching you self defence, self-confidence and also keeping you fit and healthy no matter your age.  We offer 2 FREE lessons to all who sign up via the web site.

If you don’t live in my area and are interested in Choi Kwang Do then please visit http://www.ChoiKwangDo.com where you can find the nearest location to you.  Most of the classes offer some sort of free lessons so please take a look.

Regards

Dale Miller

Master Instructor of Choi Kwang Do.

The 3 Basic Choi Kwang Do Blocks and how to apply them.

As I have stated before in a few of my blog posts, a LOT of thought has gone into the development of Choi Kwang Do by its founder, Grandmaster Kwang Jo Choi.  After injuring himself from his days of Tae Kwon Do training, and also seeing how the blocks being taught in TKD to the Korean army were causing damage to the arms, and even breaking the blocking arms, especially when blocking someone kicking with heavy boots on he decided to change how the basic blocks should be applied.

To better understand the changes made to the TKD blocks, lets first have a look at how a TKD practitioner is expected to block.  This is in no way meant to disrespect Tae Kwon Do, or any traditional martial art, I am just putting this video on here so you can compare and see the changes made.  I am not knocking Tae Kwon Do in any way shape or form, just critiquing the blocks for self defence purposes.  And this is not in any way shape or form meant to disrespect the instructor teaching these blocks who seems to be performing them with great skill from my limited knowledge of TKD.


One of the fundamental insights Grandmaster Choi understands is human psychology and how we react when some attack is thrown towards us.  If an object is thrown towards us, our natural instinct is to shift away and use our arms to protect ourselves, so the first part of every one of the basic Choi Kwang Do blocks utilises this natural reaction and we shift our body weight away from the attack and keep our guard up.  This benefits you greatly in a self defence situation as it creates distance between yourself and the attacker and gains you extra time to react to the block.  As you can see in the TKD demonstration above there is no shift back of the body weight and in fact you will see some TKD practitioners teaching you to step forward towards the attacker prior to performing the block.  This type of movement increases the chance of you getting hit before you even have a chance to react to the attack.

By utilizing this shift back, creating distance you are increasing your chance of defending yourself by giving yourself more time, and even if you make a mistake with the block, you are more likely to be slipping slightly out of range, or at worst, getting hit with the tail end of the punch where the power and impact diminishes.

Also, notice with the TKD blocks how complex the arm positions are.  You are being attacked, so you have to get your arms first into one position, then perform the block.  Your brain has very little time in which to register the attack coming towards you and send the appropriate signals to your arms on how to perform the block.This overly complex movement pattern in the TKD blocks increases the chances of you getting hit.  What you will notice from the Choi Kwang Do blocks is that they are all performed from the same guard position.  The arms don’t need to move to one position and then another to perform the block.  By making our movements more economical we increase the chance that our block will be successful.

From his time in the military teaching TKD to the army, Grandmaster Choi noticed that when performing the blocks against opponents wearing heavy military boots, that a lot of practitioners were breaking their arms.  The reason for this is the position of the arm and the part of the arm that impacts on blocking.  You have two main bones in your forearm, the radius and the ulna.  Traditional arts tend to use the blade of the arm, which is the outside bone in the forearm, called the ulna, to impact when blocking.  This places the load of the impact solely on the Ulna bone.  Also the twisting motion of the arm when performing some of the blocks can cause the radius and ulna to cross partly in the arm, causing a slight overlap which can apply extra pressure on the bones when a strong impact is made and increases the chance of snapping.

Grandmaster Choi’s philosophy is that there is no point learning self defence, if what you are practicing is actually causing the body harm.  So he looked at how to reduce the chance of breaking the bones in the arm when blocking, especially when defending kicks of people wearing heavy boots.  His solution was simple.  In Choi Kwang Do we look to impact our blocks with both the radius and ulna bones.  Spreading the impact load across the two bones and also the muscle and tissue surrounding them, giving extra padding and protection making them much safer to use.

Finally you will notice that in Choi Kwang Do blocks that while the blocking hand is being used, the other hand is kept in the same position keeping guard.  This gives you an extra advantage with the fact that should after you shift back, block, and still miss the incoming technique your rear hand is there to use either for an emergency rear hand block or at the very least move to intercept the attack and jam it.

So hopefully this article will have given you a good understanding of how the Choi Kwang Do blocks have developed from the old TKD blocks and also give you a much greater appreciation of how much more of an improvement they are on traditional blocks.  I hope that this article has not come across as disrespectful to Traditional Arts such as Tae Kwon Do or the people that practice it.  My only aim is to highlight the differences of the Choi Kwang Do blocks and the reasoning behind them.

To compare the Choi Kwang Do blocks please take a look at the following video.

I hope you enjoy this article.  If you are interested in Choi Kwang Do classes for your child, family member or yourself and are in the Bristol or Trowbridge area then please go to my web site at http://www.CKDBristol.co.uk for more information on our Choi Kwang Do classes that are great for teaching you self defence, self confidence and also keeping you fit and healthy no matter your age.  We offer 2 FREE lessons to all who sign up via the web site.

If you don’t live in my area and are interested in Choi Kwang Do then please visit http://choikwangdo.com/locations.html where you can find the nearest location to you.  Most of the classes offer some sort of free lessons so please take a look.

If you are already an instructor in another Martial Art and you would be interested in converting to Choi Kwang Do please go to http://choikwangdo.com/school-conversion.html or contact them by email at ckd@choikwangdo.com and let them know you found them through Master Millers blog.

Regards

Dale Miller

Master Instructor of Choi Kwang Do.